Stages of Injury and Recovery

As a Doctor of Chiropractic it is my job to help patients move and function better, and to help them recover from injuries they may be dealing with.  There is more than just the physical healing that occurs with an injury.  These injuries do not have to be life threatening, maybe just enough to prevent you for doing the things you love to do or maybe even prevent you from doing your normal activities of daily living.  There is also the psychological aspect of getting injured- which is what I wanted to focus on in this Blog.  When we lose someone we love or even a family pet, we usually go through the 5 stages of grief, well that also happens (to a lesser degree) when we lose our ability to do the things we love to do.  I wanted to highlight those 5 stages here in respect to getting injured to help lead you towards recovery.  It doesn’t matter if you are a professional athlete or just someone who likes to work in their garden, when what we love to do is taken away from us, we often go through these 5 stages of injury and recovery.

Denial

When you first experience the shock of an injury, you immediately begin an internal dialogue in which you try to convince yourself that it’s not that bad. You probably try to run, lift or garden just like you normally do, a typical form of denial that often makes matters worse. Another common thought is that the injury will ease off in a couple of days. If you continue to do your activity of choice you may aggravate the injury. In extreme cases, some people pretend there is no injury.

Anger

Often fueled by thoughts like “Why me?” or “Why now?” you direct anger at yourself for a mistake that caused the injury, or at someone else you think is responsible. Perhaps you got hurt cleaning your gutters, or working in your garden, or an athlete gets hurt during a critical part of the season. It’s natural to feel angry. You might even direct it at family and friends, because they might not understand the sense of loss you have when you can’t do your favorite activities.

Bargaining 

In a sense, this is an extension of denial. You accept the injury and endure the pain, but you try to ignore it or overcome it by adapting your activities to avoid the injured area. This usually leads to your body getting out of balance by overcompensating for the injury. Bargaining with your body by overcompensating may actually make the injury worse.

Depression

Grieving over your enforced time off from your favorite activities can lead to a form of depression, at least certainly a distinct sadness. You might feel like the entire season is lost, or that rehab will never get you back to 100%, or, worst case, that you will never finish that project in the yard or never completely recover.

Acceptance

For rehabilitation to be effective, this is the stage you need to get to. The preceding stages are completely natural and understandable. Recognize them for what they are. Just saying that you have to “pull yourself together” is a form of denial. Work through that and other stages by talking to friends, therapists and family. They can help get you to the point of acceptance. If you achieve acceptance early, you can start working on your rehab right away, even while you are going through the other stages.

Getting to a Positive Attitude

Taking positive action will get you to acceptance sooner. No matter how difficult it is, a positive attitude is your best strategy on the road to recovery. Understanding the natural stages you are going through is the first step. No one escapes unscathed from at least some of the stages; they cannot be avoided. Getting back on track takes a dedicated attitude and a commitment to excellence.

If you are dealing with any kind of injury that is keeping you from your favorite activities, please come in for an appointment here at Performance Health Center and we will do our best to get you back to doing the things you love to do.  Your body and your mind will thank you for it.

If you have any questions about this blog or your health in general you can reach me at: drtomball@performancehealthcenter.com

It’s Not Just About Vitamin C Anymore…Try Zinc this Fall!

With school back in session, so are all the GERMS that come with this time of year.  Fun times!  Generally speaking, most people reach for the bottle of Vitamin C if they feel a cold coming on this time of year, or to prepare in the event of a possible cold.  I am not saying that Vitamin C isn’t effective (as I do take it daily), but more and more studies are showing that Zinc has some very beneficial qualities when it comes to dealing with the common cold, also known as the rhinovirus.

Without going into great detail, and pulling multiple research studies at this time, some studies are showing that Vitamin C does not actually do much to prevent the common cold.  Sorry Airborne L.  Zinc, being the mineral that it is, seems to somehow interfere with the replication of the rhinovirus. Zinc influences the immune system in a few different ways.  Zinc helps the immune system recruit white blood cells for proper and better immune system function, helps reduce systematic inflammation in the body, and is also an antioxidant – not too shabby Mr. Zinc J.  Some studies that have also been done in the past few years have shown that people who started taking zinc after recently getting sick, had less severe symptoms from the cold, and the duration of the cold was not as long either.

Zinc is what they call a “trace element”.  The cells of our immune system rely on Zinc to function. If one is getting enough zinc into their diet, the T-cells and other immune cells in our bodies can be greatly affected.  Based on what Harvard Medical Researchers say, the suggested daily amount of Zinc is 15-25mg.  Taking in an excessive amount of this supplement can actually cause a reverse reaction on the body, and is usually best to follow the recommended daily amount, or the amount prescribed by your physician.

If you are a person interested in getting more Zinc into your diet naturally, chickpeas, kidney beans, mushrooms, crab and chicken, are all good sources of food where Zinc can be found.  Lozenges like Cold-Ez or syrups containing Zinc, can also help aid in support when you are not feeling well.  If you are a person who would prefer to supplement, or your doctor has told you to do so, Metagenics ( www.metagenics.com ) has a supplement called, Zinc A.G.

Zinc A.G. is a special formula with enhanced absorption to help better address zinc repletion in the body. I use the Metagenics brand for Zinc, and that is what we carry or you can order at or through our office.  I do not necessarily take Zinc all year around, but I do use it through out certain parts of the year to help fight off pesky germs, and when I may be training at a higher intensity or for a race and take as needed.  I do not find that Zinc really has any bad side effects either, other than it doesn’t smell the greatest.  Sometimes people can complain of nausea, but if I take most of my vitamins or supplements on an empty stomach, I do become nauseous regardless.  If you have any questions regarding Zinc or other supplements we carry in our office, or in general, please feel free to ask me when in the office, or email me anytime at: drv@performancehealthcenter.com.  Happy Back to School everyone, and so not ready for the summer to come to an end.

If you want to orderZinc A.G, or any of Metagenics products on-line you can do so with this link: Order Metagenics NOW!

 

CHEERS TO CHERRIES

Just this morning after a nice bike ride, my friend and I were comparing smoothie recipes and were discussing what we each like to put in our smoothies.  I have been using a combination of coconut/almond milk, pineapple, Vega-one protein powder and a mix of frozen berries which includes blueberries, strawberries and cherries.  I always thought the blueberries were the best source of antioxidants, but after a little research I see that cherries pack even a bigger punch.  I decided to look into what other health benefits cherries can provide us and I wanted to share that information with you.

Cherries are high in antioxidants and high in quercetin. 

Cherries are full of antioxidants. These antioxidants have a number of different benefits, including the ability to prevent cancer and heart disease, as well as fighting off free radicals. The antioxidants found in cherries also work to slow the signs of aging. All cherries contain their own antioxidants but sour cherries have the most, beating out even blueberries with their antioxidant content.

Cherries are rich in quercetin, a natural flavonoid that is associated with strong antioxidant and health properties. Quercetin helps neutralize potential DNA damage caused by free radicals and may help protect against heart disease and certain cancers, including breast, colon, prostate and lung. In addition, it has strong anti-inflammatory and antihistamine effects.

A serving of sweet cherries (5 ounces, 1 cup or about 21 cherries) provides 90 calories and 3 grams fiber.  Cherries are a good source of potassium and vitamin C. Cherries are also a great source of anthocyanins, bioactive compounds that provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, cardiovascular and other benefits. Research shows that melatonin, catechins and flavanols in cherries contribute to the fruit’s healthfulness, too.

They stabilize blood sugar levels. Cherries have among the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load values of all fruit. The glycemic index for cherries is 22, and the glycemic load is three. The glycemic index measures the effect that a carbohydrate-containing food has on blood sugar levels. A score of zero to 55 is considered low. The glycemic load measures the blood sugar response in a standard serving of the food.

They help ease joint pain. Several studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of cherries can help reduce inflammation that affects individuals with arthritis and gout. A study from USDA study found that Bing cherries specifically helped lower participants’ blood uric acid levels. High blood uric acid is associated with gout. Another study found that cherry consumption was associated with a 35 percent reduction in incidence of a gout attack over a two-day period. Cherry intake coupled with traditional gout pharmaceuticals reduced incidence of attacks by 75 percent. 

They act as an all-natural sleep aid. Research with tart cherry varieties show that they are rich in melatonin, a compound that helps regulate your body’s natural sleep-wake patterns. Studies show that supplements with cherry juice concentrate have been associated with improved sleep.

While your body does have the ability to produce its own melatonin, it typically does so only in darkness and not everyone is able to produce all the melatonin that is needed. Factors such as the artificial lighting that is found in many offices and homes limit how much melatonin is produced by your body. Eating cherries might help boost melatonin levels in your body.

You’ll get more out of your workouts. Cherries and cherry juice are often promoted for recovery post-exercise because of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. One study showed that strength athletes who consumed tart cherry supplement experienced better recovery from intensive strength training, compared to when they took a fruit juice control beverage. Other studies with endurance athletes also link cherry compounds to enhanced recovery following exhaustive exercise.

They’re all-American. The United States is the second-leading producer of cherries in the world (Turkey is No. 1). Sweet cherries are grown primarily in Washington, Oregon and California, while tart cherries are grown primarily in Michigan, Utah and Washington.

Enjoy fresh cherries now because their season is short – from May through August. Or you can always use frozen cherries in your own smoothie recipe- they will boost your smoothie’s nutritional power!

If you have any questions about this blog or about your health in general, please feel free to contact me at: drtomball@performancehealthcenter.com

Magnesium, What a Hot Topic These Days!

Magnesium seems to be quite a hot topic today in the supplement field, and the field of health and wellness!  I have been poking some and  want to share some of the information with you all about what exactly Magnesium is, what is does, where you can find sources of this mineral, who is at risk to be deficient, and what some of the signs or symptoms are…

Magnesium is a mineral, for those of you that are not familiar.  Magnesium is also a cofactor in relation to over 300 enzyme systems that control complex biochemical reactions throughout the body (a little more technical them some of you probably care to know, but have to throw a little of the science and medical part in here and there too).   Muscle and nerve function, regulation of blood pressure, blood glucose control, energy production, protein synthesis, transporting calcium and potassium across cell membranes, bone structural development, and synthesis of DNA/RNA, are some of the most important reactions Magnesium helps to regulate.  I honestly didn’t realize that Magnesium contributed to ALL of these things plus more, until I started digging around for more information.

The balance of Magnesium in greatly controlled by the kidneys.  The kidney excretes around 120mg of magnesium into the urine each day. There is about 25g of magnesium in the adult body, and over have of it resides in the bones and the rest in the soft tissue (muscles, tendons, fascia, etc).  There is only a very small amount of magnesium that resides in the actual blood serum.  With that being said, it can be a little more difficult to test, and usually a combination of blood tests, urinalysis, saliva tests, and a thorough consultation are performed to be sure if one is deficient or not.

There are a wide variety of beverages, animal and plant foods that have magnesium in them.  Tap, mineral and bottled water contain certain levels of magnesium in them.  Nuts, seeds, spinach, legumes, and whole grains contain a good level of magnesium as well.  Fortified foods and cereals may contain added amounts of magnesium, but some types of food processing actually lower the content of magnesium.  Personally, I recommend trying to find magnesium through more natural food sources, not cereal or processed foods if can be helped.  And though you may think you are taking in a fair amount of magnesium in through your diet, only about 30-40% of dietary magnesium is actually absorbed by the body.

Listed below from The National Institute of Health are some food sources and the levels of magnesium found in them:

Table 2: Selected Food Sources of Magnesium [10]
Food Milligrams
(mg) per
serving
Percent
DV*
Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce 80 20
Spinach, boiled, ½ cup 78 20
Cashews, dry roasted, 1 ounce 74 19
Peanuts, oil roasted, ¼ cup 63 16
Cereal, shredded wheat, 2 large biscuits 61 15
Soymilk, plain or vanilla, 1 cup 61 15
Black beans, cooked, ½ cup 60 15
Edamame, shelled, cooked, ½ cup 50 13
Peanut butter, smooth, 2 tablespoons 49 12
Bread, whole wheat, 2 slices 46 12
Avocado, cubed, 1 cup 44 11
Potato, baked with skin, 3.5 ounces 43 11
Rice, brown, cooked, ½ cup 42 11
Yogurt, plain, low fat, 8 ounces 42 11
Breakfast cereals, fortified with 10% of the DV for magnesium 40 10
Oatmeal, instant, 1 packet 36 9
Kidney beans, canned, ½ cup 35 9
Banana, 1 medium 32 8
Salmon, Atlantic, farmed, cooked, 3 ounces 26 7
Milk, 1 cup 24–27 6–7
Halibut, cooked, 3 ounces 24 6
Raisins, ½ cup 23 6
Chicken breast, roasted, 3 ounces 22 6
Beef, ground, 90% lean, pan broiled, 3 ounces 20 5
Broccoli, chopped and cooked, ½ cup 12 3
Rice, white, cooked, ½ cup 10 3
Apple, 1 medium 9 2
Carrot, raw, 1 medium 7 2

The National Institute of Health also states that the daily recommended amount of magnesium consumed by an adult be between 310-420mg per female and male, respectively.  Now this may vary between each individual based on their health history and daily life.  It is always recommended that if one is concerned to please consult a qualified health care professional.  Keep in mind that if you are getting enough Magnesium in through natural food sources that one may not need to take a supplement, or as high of a dose.  I do manage to take in a good amount of Magnesium naturally, so I usually take one, or maybe two tablets of the Metagenics Magnesium per day.  It seems to be very gentle on my stomach, and I prefer to take my Magnesium towards the end of the day.  There are properties that are supposed to help relax the muscles and the body, and I figure I can use all the help I can get before bedtime.

Some groups that are more subject than others to have inadequate levels of magnesium are people with gastrointestinal diseases, people with migraines, people with Type II Diabetes, people with alcohol dependencies, older adults, especially those dealing with osteoporosis, and people with hypertension and/or cardiovascular disease.  These groups are more likely to consume insufficient quantities of magnesium, or have a medical condition or take medications that affect the absorption of magnesium in the gut in general.

Some signs that you are someone may be deficient in magnesium include, but are not subject to: reduced urinary excretion, nausea, vomiting, weakness, fatigue, loss of appetite.  If the deficiency continues to get worse, numbness, tingling, muscle contractions, cramps, personality changes, seizures, irregular heart rhythms or coronary spasms can take place.  Severe issues can involve low blood calcium and potassium levels as well.

I hope that this has been informative to all of you reading this.  Should you have any questions or concerns in regards to magnesium, please feel free to contact any of the doctor’s at PHC or your PCP for further questions or concerns, or email me at any time, drv@performancehealthcenter.com .  If you are someone that takes a magnesium supplement, or is looking too, Metagenics carries very high quality magnesium supplements, some of which we carry at our office that include Calcium in them as well for better absorption.  The Metagenics brand is very well known in the medical field and among health care practitioners, and can be found in many of health care providers offices.

 

 

 

 

TURMERIC, Not Just a Spice Anymore…It’s So Much More!

I have been seeing Turmeric pop up everywhere these days, whether it be in the natural root form at many grocery stores, or all over at pharmacies and health stores.  There is a big push being made for being one of the best anti-inflammatories out there!

 

If you are someone that has or takes Advil, Ibuprofen or NSAIDS (non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs).   more often than not, this may be worth reading through… These over the counter (OTC) medications are really not that good for you and can bring about serious health complications.  That being said, these are the most common over the counter drugs used for chronic pain and out there these days!  Chronic pain can be very debilitating, as well as acute pain and injury, and can have detrimental and adverse effects on one’s quality of life.  However, a majority of people trying to find a “reasonable and workable” solution for pain, usually end up reaching for a bottle of NSAID’s.

 

Most of the population doesn’t know how NSAID’s really work when ingested to help target and decrease pain in the body.  NSAIDS TEMPORARILY block the overflow of production of inflammatory cells/chemicals to the site of pain.  NSAIDS basically “trick” the body into overriding its inflammatory response to an injury.  When this happens the pain also lessens or subsides too.  With inflammation comes pain, if inflammation is removed or “blocked” more realistically, the pain is most likely “blocked” from getting to the area as well.  This helps people to feel better, so therefore they continue to take more of it to feel better.  It also gives false interpretation that the person may be “feeling better” due to having less pain, but the NSAIDS have only “masked” the symptoms and the pain usually returns, but more importantly with the possibility that the person has done more damage to the area injured thinking it was feeling better because of the NSAIDS.  We see this all the time with patients in our office, and it is our job to help educate them about the pros and cons of taking OTC NSAIDS, and when it really is or isn’t necessary.  Aside from this, use of NSAIDS can cause stomach pain, stomach ulcers, indigestion, internal bleeding, constipation, headaches, dizziness, ringing in the ears, and allergic reactions such as hives, vomiting, throat swelling etc.  I mean, why would someone not look for more natural ways to help decrease inflammation, pain and swelling?

There are many natural supplements out there now that help to decrease pain and inflammation (which I will write about in some future articles), but turmeric by far seems to be one of the most powerful.  Turmeric is a plant, and not only one of the most popular spices around, but one of the most powerful super foods.  The root is what is most commonly used in medicine.  Medicinal use of turmeric is dated back over 4,000 years ago, wow!  Today there are many uses for turmeric such as detoxification, promoting radiant skin, mood balancing, supporting cardiac health, decreasing inflammation, etc.  A few of the most important uses of turmeric are reducing pain, being a very strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidant.  Turmeric helps to lower the levels of two different enzymes in the body that cause inflammation, not “block” the inflammation to the area of injury.  Antioxidants also help to fight free radicals that can even potentially reduce some of the damage these free radicals cause in the body.  This helps in regards to the level of inflammation in the body as well, or when responding to inflammation from an injury.  I figured this was a good month to help remind our patients and many others that read the newsletter about Turmeric and its health benefits.  Being that spring, well maybe even summer is possibly here (though, I will believe it when I see it), everyone is getting outside doing yard work, and starting to exercise more, and we have seen an increase of injuries in the office, and wanted some other ways to help our patients feel better naturally when not in the office.

Many turmeric supplements, like other vitamins and supplements, are not absorbed well into the body, so it is important to make sure you are buying turmeric from a reputable company.  As we always say, please be sure to speak to your naturopathic doctor, chiropractic physician or nutritionist in regards to any questions concerning the quality of the supplement you may be taking.  At Performance Health Center we carry a very popular and reputable brand of vitamins and supplements by MetagenicsMetagenics makes a supplement called, Inflavinoids (which I know I have probably mentioned several times over the years in practice), that has turmeric in it as well, along with some other natural anti-inflammatories.  We prescribe this supplement primarily to decrease inflammation in the patient’s body if a patient is dealing with an injury.  It almost acts like a “natural Ibuprofen”.   A patient can take 2-4 capsules 2-4 times a day, just as someone taking some other type of NSAID would.  This supplement helps when people are dealing with chronic back pain, ankle sprains, and even whiplash from an accident, but even helps in many acute situations and injuries as well.  I personally take 1-2 capsules a day for preventive measures to help keep levels of inflammation lower in my body.  I also keep it on hand as it has helped decrease symptoms when I get a headache as well.  There are some other supplements by Metagenics we offer as well that help to decrease inflammation, and that are more helpful with acute injuries, that I will discuss another time.  Until then, this is something you may want to speak to one of us about in the office during your next visit.

Many other chiropractic facilities and medical offices carry the Metagenics brand as well. Should you have more questions in regards to this topic, please feel free me at DrV@PerformanceHealthCenter.com.

 

 

Your Mind is Powerful; Use it Wisely!

More and more evidence is proving what we’ve been told our whole lives is true; “You are what you think.”   Hopefully, after you read this you’ll be more careful about what you think about because it can fundamentally affect you and your health!

It’s now a few years old, but in 2011 the “milkshake study” was published.  The same exact milkshake was given to the subjects on 2 separate occasions, except the labels were different each time. One label was “indulgent” and stated the milkshake was high calorie and fat.  The other label on the exact same milkshake was “sensible” and was described as low calorie and low fat.  Amazingly enough, the milkshake was metabolized differently in the subjects even though the ingredients were exactly the same.  The Indulgent labeled shake produced a significant decrease in the levels of Grehlin, one of our body’s “hunger hormones”. The drop in the hunger hormone was 3 times greater than in the sensible labeled milkshake.  When drinking what was believed to be a high fat, high calorie shake the body was fooled by the mind and was made to feel fuller, or more satiated.  The difference in how the milkshake was metabolized in the body was physiological.  The bottom line is what the body believed it was consuming affected how it was metabolized in the digestive system.

Additional studies have shown that the placebo effect in medications can be as high as 50%.  When a patient’s medical doctor says that medication is effective for their ailment, the mind believes it and feels better even though they are only consuming a sugar pill.  What is even more amazing is that the placebo effect exists even when the patient is told they are getting a placebo. This is called an open-label placebo.   Sounds crazy, that even when they are told they are taking a sugar pill, many patients feel better.

These are just a few examples of research documenting that your mind is pretty powerful and what you say, think and hear can influence you in ways that you never thought possible.  To read more about how your mind and body are affected by your thoughts, actions and beliefs all you need to do is Goggle positive thinking studies.  I got over 9 million results in less than half a second.  The take away is that the brain is more powerful than we realize. You need to be careful about what you say, especially your “self-speak” and you should focus on positive and empowering thoughts.  It’s not always easy to be positive.  You may have developed bad thought habits over the years and will need to make a conscious effort to be positive.

I try to be positive in both my personal and professional life. Chiropractic care is not a placebo, but I have found during my 34 years in practice what I say and how I say it can influence and improve how my patient’s respond to treatment.  For those patient’s I feel I can help, I focus my explanations in realistic terms, but always try to focus on the positive changes that will happen in their bodies as they receive their chiropractic treatments.  I remind my patient that it takes time to get healthy especially with chronic pain syndromes causes by joint dysfunctions, muscles imbalances and degenerative changes.  I also know that when my patient’s stick with their treatment recommendations they are usually glad they did both short term and long term.

You might have already forgotten many of the New Year’s resolutions you made just two months ago, but being positive it not as difficult as it may seem. If you need more motivation-Positive people live longer and are healthier!  Yes, there is research on that too!

DrBradWeiss@PerformanceHealthCenter.com

The Benefits of Yoga

I recently started practicing Yoga again on a weekly basis, and I wanted to share some of the Health benefits that I have found from practicing Yoga.  I always feel mentally and physically refreshed after practicing yoga, and here are some of the benefits listed.

Physical Benefits

Many people find that the relaxation techniques incorporated in yoga can lessen chronic pain, such as lower back pain, arthritis, and headaches.

Other physical benefits of yoga include:

  • Increased flexibility
  • Increased muscle strength and tone
  • Improved respiration, energy and vitality
  • Maintaining a balanced metabolism
  • Weight reduction
  • Cardio and circulatory health
  • Improved athletic performance
  • Protection from injury

Mental Benefits

Aside from the physical benefits, one of the best benefits of yoga is how it helps you manage stress, which is known to have devastating effects on the body and mind.  I see it every day with my patients…stress can reveal itself in many ways, including back or neck pain, sleeping problems, headaches, and an inability to concentrate. Yoga can be very effective in developing coping skills and reaching a more positive outlook on life.

Yoga’s incorporation of meditation and breathing can help improve a person’s mental well-being. Regular yoga practice can help create mental clarity and calmness; increase your body awareness; relieve chronic stress patterns; relax your mind; and maybe even sharpen concentration.

While there are more than 100 different types, or schools, of yoga, most sessions typically include breathing exercises, meditation, and assuming postures that stretch and flex various muscle groups.

Beginners Are Welcome

Because there are so many different kinds of yoga practices, it is possible for anyone to start.

There are more than 100 different forms of yoga. Some are fast-paced and intense. Others are gentle and relaxing.

Examples of different yoga forms include:

Hatha – the form most often associated with yoga, it combines a series of basic movements with breathing.

Vinyasa – a series of poses that flow smoothly into one another.

Power – a faster, higher-intensity practice that builds muscle.

Ashtanga – a series of poses, combined with a special breathing technique.

Bikram – also known as “hot yoga,” it’s a series of 26 challenging poses performed in a room heated to a high temperature.

Iyengar a type of yoga that uses props like blocks, straps, and chairs to help you move your body into the proper alignment.

Getting Started

Classes are a great way to get into yoga, even if you’re already pretty fit. In addition to yoga studios, classes are widely available at health clubs, community centers and spas. Most of these places offer introductory or gentle yoga classes that will familiarize you with the basic yoga format and style.

Give Yoga a go, you might be surprised how much you like it.

I believe that Yoga is a lot like Chiropractic in that they both focus on your body’s natural tendency toward health and self-healing.

If you have any questions about this Blog or your health in general you can contact me at: drtomball@performancehealthcenter.com

 

Bioelectric Medicine or Electroceuticals : The Future of Modern Medicine?

The future of medicine maybe closer than you think!  Bioelectric Medicine and Electroceuticals are top name contenders for this new branch of medicine.  As researcher’s better understand and learn how to manipulate the electrical impulses of the nervous system we will have more targeted and safer ways to treat disease and stay healthy.  Last year clinical trial was published demonstrating a small electrical device  implanted in the neck near the vagus nerve to eliminate the cause of inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis showed positive results in 12 out of 17 patients.   Medicare already pays for electrical treatments of Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy.  A well known example of Bioelectric Medicine are Pacemakers which have been used to electrically regulate heart rhythms for decades.

Venture capitalists have already invested $100 million in Biomedical Medicine.  Imran Eba of Action Potential Venture Capital located in Cambridge said, “If we can understand how…electric signals travel through the nervous system…then we can start treating disease in a totally different way.”   New advances in medicine are always exciting.  Influencing the nervous system is fascinating.  Influencing the nervous system to restore and maintain health is not new news to the chiropractic profession!  Chiropractors have been influencing the optimizing nerve energy in the body since its founding in 1895!

In 1895, chiropractic care began in Davenport, Iowa.  The founder, D.D. Palmer‘s first adjustment did not relieve low back pain, it restored deafness! The story goes; D.D. Palmer was a self -taught healer.  (Prior to the Flexner Report in 1910 medical training was not standardized and many healers were self-taught.  D.D. Palmer was on those self-taught healers).  Harvey Lillard was a janitor in the building D.D. Palmer had his practice in.    Harvey was almost completely deaf.  Seventeen years earlier while in a cramped, stooped position, he felt a pop in his spine and went deaf.

After hearing Harvey’s history and feeling his spine, D.D. Palmer postulated that there was a bone out of place interfering with the flow of energy in the nervous system.  He got permission from Harvey to push the vertebrae back into place.  Immediately after Harvey’s hearing was restored.  D.D. Palmer proclaimed that he corrected the flow of nerve energy which restored his hearing.

I was deaf 17 years and I expected to always remain so, for I had doctored a great deal without    any benefit. I had long ago made up my mind to not take any more ear treatments, for it did me no good. Last January Dr. Palmer told me that my deafness came from an injury in my spine. This was new to me; but it is a fact that my back was injured at the time I went deaf. Dr. Palmer treated me on the spine; in two treatments I could hear quite well. That was eight months ago. My hearing remains good. HARVEY LILLARD,

D.D. Palmer named this new healing art that restores nerve energy flow chiropractic, which comes from a Greek work which means “done by hand”.  D.D. Palmer in his voluminous writings preferred to use the term “dis-ease” rather than disease to explain many human ailments.  He defined dis-ease as “too much or not enough nerve energy”.   Today research continues to prove D.D. Palmer’s theory’s correct on many levels.  Your body can not be healthy unless the brain can communicate properly to all the cells of the body, and this communication is electric.  Conventional wisdom now points to the fact that nerves can get pinched by herniated discs, but probably more often spinal joints don’t move correctly and get stuck which irritates the nerves.  The original premise of Chiropractic is that adjustments, or spinal manipulation, puts motion back into the spine which corrects the electrical impulses of the nervous system which control all the systems in the body.

Chiropractic care for those who keep up with the literature is the most effective, safest and most cost-effective treatment for musculoskeletal problems. Ninety-Five percent (95%) or more of my patients present for pain syndromes associated with the spine.  Sitting, computers, cell phones and just standing on 2 legs can be challenging to the spine and the delicate nervous system.  Maybe it’s time for all of us to stay healthy by keeping nerve energy flowing optimally to present dis-ease.

Medical advances are amazing and as a result we are living longer and more productive lives.  Maybe Bioelectric Medicine is the future of healthcare since there is promise that it can target cells and malfunctions in the body without the side-effects and cost of modern medicine.  Still, we should always start first with the body’s ability to heal itself naturally.  Chiropractic care has always been a big part of natural healing because it optimizes the function of the nervous system and optimizes nerve energy so the brain communicates properly to the various organ systems in the body.  In 34 years of practice it is amazing how many patients who came to see me because of back pain comment on how their digestive issues or allergies have improved or cleared up. How is your nervous system energy functioning?  If you are not sure, start the New Year with a nervous system function check-up at Performance Health Center.

For more information please email me at drbradweiss@performancehealthcenter.com

Zinc, It’s Not Just about Vitamin C Anymore…

With school just around the corner, so are all the GERMS that come with this time of year.  Fun times!  Generally speaking, most people reach for the bottle of Vitamin C if they feel a cold coming on this time of year, or to prepare in the event of a possible cold.  I am not saying that Vitamin C isn’t effective (as I do take it daily), but more and more studies are showing that Zinc has some very beneficial qualities when it comes to dealing with the common cold, also known as the rhinovirus.

Without going into great detail, and pulling multiple research studies at this time, some studies are showing that Vitamin C does not actually do much to prevent the common cold.  Sorry Airborne L.  Zinc, being the mineral that it is, seems to somehow interfere with the replication of the rhinovirus. Zinc influences the immune system in a few different ways.  Zinc helps the immune system recruit white blood cells for proper and better immune system function, helps reduce systematic inflammation in the body, and is also an antioxidant – not too shabby Mr. Zinc J.  Some studies that have also been done in the past few years have shown that people who started taking zinc after recently getting sick, had less severe symptoms from the cold, and the duration of the cold was not as long either.

Zinc is what they call a “trace element”.  The cells of our immune system rely on Zinc to function. If one is getting enough zinc into their diet, the T-cells and other immune cells in our bodies can be greatly affected.  Based on what Harvard Medical Researchers say, the suggested daily amount of Zinc is 15-25mg.  Taking in an excessive amount of this supplement can actually cause a reverse reaction on the body, and is usually best to follow the recommended daily amount, or the amount prescribed by your physician.

If you are a person interested in getting more Zinc into your diet naturally, chickpeas, kidney beans, mushrooms, crab and chicken, are all good sources of food where Zinc can be found.  Lozenges like Cold-Ez or syrups containing Zinc, can also help aid in support when you are not feeling well.  If you are a person who would prefer to supplement, or your doctor has told you to do so, Metagenics ( www.metagenics.com ) has a supplement called, Zinc A.G.  Zinc A.G. is a special formula with enhanced absorption to help better address zinc repletion in the body.  This is the brand I use, and that we carry or you can order at or through our office.  I do not necessarily take Zinc all year around, but I do use it through out certain parts of the year to help fight off pesky germs, and when I may be training at a higher intensity for something if needed.  I do not find that Zinc really has any bad side effects either, other than it doesn’t smell the greatest, and sometimes people complain of nausea.  If I don’t take my supplements with some type of food or little snack, I can become nauseous regardless of what supplement it is.  If you have any questions regarding Zinc or other supplements, please feel free to email me anytime at: drv@performancehealthcenter.com.  Happy Back to School everyone, and so not ready for the summer to come to an end!

 

 

Tips to Relieve Back Pain

Your first step should be to seek out professional help.  Whether you see your PCP, a Physical Therapist, an Orthopedic Physician, or a Chiropractic Physician, start by finding a professional trained to diagnose and treat back pain.  There are a multitude of factors that can cause back pain, and getting the proper diagnosis is the best place to start.  If you are looking for a non-invasive non-pharmacologic option, Chiropractic has shown in many studies to be statistically the best choice.

 

“Patients with chronic low-back pain treated by chiropractors showed greater improvement and satisfaction at one month than patients treated by family physicians. Satisfaction scores were higher for chiropractic patients. A higher proportion of chiropractic patients (56 percent vs. 13 percent) reported that their low-back pain was better or much better, whereas nearly one-third of medical patients reported their low-back pain was worse or much worse.”       

Nyiendo et al (2000), Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

 

Keep moving.  Many PCP’s and Orthopedic Physicians recommend bed rest, but this can often make things worse.  We say every day to our patients, “Life is motion”.  We are designed to move each and every day.  Many of our patients tell us the prolonged sitting or standing they do is often their biggest contributor to their chronic back pain.  Let pain be your guide, any movement or motion that does not make your condition worse will usually help it get better sooner.  We find many times the cuase of the back pain are fixated vertebrae- that is they are not moving properly. These “fixations” can be caused by a multitude of factors, i.e. physical or emotional stress, some sort of trauma, poor posture, or even a poor diet can contribute to these vertebral “fixations”, which we refer to as “subluxations”.  Chiropractors are the only specialists that are trained specifically to locate and correct these vertebral subluxations.

If your chronic pain is related to emotional or work-related stress, try some relaxation techniques to help reduce muscle tension.  If your job or lifestyle requires lots of physical stress, make sure to use good posture and be sure to take stretch breaks often.

Exercise regularly- this helps in many ways: gets your spine moving; reduces stress; increases blood flow; and helps strengthen the muscles that support your spine.  What exercises are best for your back?  Well that may be different for each of us, but first find something you can currently do without pain, and make sure it is something you enjoy as you will be much more likely to stick with it.  My people find Yoga and/or swimming to help their chronic back pain, but as I mentioned earlier find what works best for you.  Make sure to warm up properly: including some foam rolling, then be sure to maintain good posture throughout your exercise, and be sure to stretch when you are done.

Get enough rest.  Make sure you have a good mattress to sleep on, and beware of your sleeping “posture” as well.  Avoid sleeping on your stomach as that can cause the neck and head to twist and put stress on your spine.  If you sleep on your back consider putting a pillow under your knees, and if you sleep on your side consider putting a pillow between your knees.

These are just a few more “tips” to help you improve your back pain.  If you have any questions about this Blog or about your health in general, please feel free to contact me at: drtomball@performancehealthcenter.com